Tag Archives: Social media

Jewellery Business Week Case Study: Using social media to grow your business

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Silversmith Karen Young has been working hard to build up her jewellery business Karen Young Handmade Jewellery and her use of social media caught the eye of the LJS team. We talked to her about how she uses social media to promote her business and products

Which social media do you use? (e.g. instagram, twitter etc)

I am on all of the main social media platforms – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ but the main ones that my target audience are on regularly are Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest so I tend to focus most on those.  I also have a blog on my website and send a newsletter about once a month.

Whilst Facebook still drives the most traffic to my online shops and has the best conversion rate into sales, Instagram is fast catching up! I love Instagram the best out of all the platforms – it is so visual and I have found a wonderful community there.

 

How have you built up your social media following?

Sheer hard work and consistency! It is possible to buy followers on social media but I really wouldn’t recommend it.  I have always felt that the point of social media is to cultivate engagement and dialogue with followers so they get to know and trust you and you can’t do that if they are fake accounts.  So I have built my following on each platform over time and by replying to comments on my feeds and direct messages, and being active daily on the platforms.  I post virtually daily on Instagram and try and take the most beautiful pictures I can and about 3-4 times a week on Facebook and Twitter.  I need to spend a bit more time on my Pinterest boards and blog more consistently in 2016.

How has social media helped drive your sales?

Social media definitely drives more traffic to my online shops and ultimately drives sales, but I have never used social media for sales alone.   Unlike large jewellery stores and brands I don’t have a massive marketing budget and social media not only allows my brand to reach people all across the world, but more importantly lets me actively communicate and engage with my target customers.  People shop small over bigger brands because your story and why you do what you do speaks to them and you can really get that across using social media.

Also it takes time for your followers to get to know you on social media and trust you, so they may not buy from you for months or even years so you won’t get sales from social media overnight.  But if you focus on providing great customer service, creating great products, post great content with beautiful pictures, and do so consistently then the sales will come.

I also use social media (in particular Facebook) to do research into my target customers.  If you don’t really understand who you are selling to and what motivates them then posting on social media can be a little hit or miss.  On business Facebook pages once you get over 100 likes then you get access to some pretty fantastic and powerful tools that can help you understand your customers better which means what you post on social media improves over time.  I have used Facebook to build a profile of my ideal customer: where she shops, what her demographics are, what motivates her or scares her.  I have even given her a name!  I target all my social media messaging to her.  That’s not to say that other people won’t buy from me but I am talking to someone instead of everyone (or even worse – nobody).

I also use my newsletter email list (did you know you can import your email list into Facebook Ads Manager?) and target ads to them which is cheaper than ads to totally new audiences.  Your email list is important as social media algorithms can change in a heartbeat (organic reach on Facebook for example is harder than ever to achieve) and you have no control over it but you own your email list.

I do use Facebook ads now and again and have found them to be very powerful (again these work best if you have spent some time defining your target customer) to promote my shop and also to boost important posts so they reach more of my target audience.

 

What kinds of things do you post on social media? What do you find gets you the most response?

I don’t like to be too salesy on social media as for me it isn’t just all about sales it is about cultivating a relationship with my followers and letting them get to know me and my brand.  I tend to post in the region of 2-3 engagement type posts to every sales or call to action post.

I spend a lot of time styling my photo so that they look beautiful and that when people are scrolling down their feed on social media they will catch your eye – I tend to get more engagement and comments when I have taken the time to take the best photograph I can.  I take all my social media photos using my iPhone using the Camera+ app which means I can adjust exposure, crop, balance colour etc on my phone and add text using picmonkey, canva or wordswag if I need to.

I post a mix of styled product shots, work in progress, behind the scenes snapshots, quotes and the occasional selfie so that people can put a face to my brand.  I don’t tend to post too much really personal stuff (unless it directly relates to my business – for example before Christmas my boys helped me make a ring for Granny’s birthday so I posted pictures of them at work but I don’t post pics of my lunch for example as it doesn’t fit with my brand).  Behind the scenes shots work well and people really seem to love quotes particularly on Instagram.  Also short videos seem to do well and get higher engagement and visibility particularly on Facebook.

I use Iconosquare for Instagram and Facebook tools to keep an eye on content that is generating the most engagement and to understand what hashtags on Instagram are working well so you can tweak and improve your content over time.  You can use scheduling tools to schedule your posts but I just tend to just set aside time to post on each platform as that way I can respond to comments and engage with my followers when I post as it feels a little bit more authentic.

Each month I plan out a detailed social media calendar which is about 80% complete that is a mix of engagement posts and call to actions.  I don’t like to do a 100% completed calendar as I want a little room for spontaneity and to be able to keep my feed authentic.  I detail which platform, what kind of post (engagement, call to action), what the picture or video will be and what my caption will be.  This means I don’t need to think too much about social media meaning I have more making time.

What piece of advice would you give to someone just starting out with social media to promote their business?

When you start out on a social media platform, take the time to fill out your bio including links to how customers can either contact your or buy from you.  I like to include a little about my why. And if you run a business make sure that business is listed in your About section on your personal Facebook profile.  That way if people find you on Facebook they can find a route through to your business page.

Then start posting great content and following other accounts.  Build organically and focus on quality rather than quantity. And let people know you are on the platform through your business cards, your website or online shop and even ask people to tag you on social media if they are happy with their purchase.

What are your plans/hopes for your jewellery business in the coming years?

My business is still fairly new so I want to build on a great 2015 and really start to grow and develop my business in 2016 and beyond.

Firstly I want to rebuild my website now I really know what I want my website to do, and direct all my marketing back to my own website rather than Etsy.  That is my main priority for the first quarter of 2016. And behind the scenes I am working to develop a new collection of personalised luxury keepsake pieces that will become tomorrow’s heirlooms, as well as celebration jewellery such as engagement and wedding rings.

I hope to build to a strong monthly revenue that will enable to me continue doing what I love without having to go back to corporate life.

Finally I am hoping to take part in some great retail fairs so that I can spend some time with my customers face to face!

Where can we find out more about you?

I sell on both Etsy (https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/KarenYoungJewellery) and my own website www.karenyoungjewellery.co.uk – please note that I am in the process of upgrading my website which will hopefully be finished soon!

 

Special Business Week offers

Don’t forget about our special offers on business courses for this week only.

These offers are only available on booking made during Jewellery Business Week 21-27 February 2016 inclusive. Call 020 3176 0546.

Click here for more details of all the business courses included in this offer.

Jewellery Business Week: Five (mostly) free ways to promote your business

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We all know that it’s not enough to have our products for sale online, we have to actively promote them. But how do we do this without spending a fortune? Jewellery business tutor Anna Campbell proposes five ways to promote your business without spending money on advertising

  1. Using social media effectively

 

Social media is a great tool to promote your business but to drive your business forward you need to use it efficiently and effectively. Here are a couple of ways you can do this

 

Check what’s working

You can do this on your facebook business page by accessing your page and clicking on ‘insights’. This shows you, amongst other things, how many people saw your post and engaged with it. See if you can spot a pattern. Do you get more engagement when you share videos? When you ask questions? Is there a time of day that is better to post? You need to check and use this information to make your posts more effective.

Scheduling

Use a scheduling tool to set up posts to publish in advance. This allows you to be more strategic with your time. My favourite tool for this is buffer which allows you to schedule posts for facebook, twitter, linkedin and google+ for free. Buffer also allows you to check the stats of the effectiveness of your posts.

Remember, if you are selling online you have the opportunity of a global marketplace so schedule some posts in the middle of the night to see if you get responses from other countries.

 

  1. Offer a freebie on a popular blog

There are a number of really popular blogs out there on fashion, make-up, lifestyle etc. Do some research about which your customers are most likely to be reading and approach the blog editor. See if you can provide a competition prize of a piece of jewellery or a set in return for a feature on the blog. OK, so technically not free, it is an affordable way to increase traffic to your website, facebook page etc.

 

  1. Pinning your work on pinterest

Pinterest is a great tool for collecting ideas and inspiration but you can also use it for promoting your products. People visit pinterest to buy and research in 2015 showed that pinners average spend is higher than other social media channels. Pinners often use pinterest to plan their buying and to save the items they want to buy so they can find them again.

You can capitalise on this by

  • making it easy for people to pin your products by having the pin it button on your website
  • pinning your own items on pinterest, ensuring that you are linking to a place the customer can buy from e.g. your website or a third party site like etsy or folksy. Make sure you include all the product information in the pin description

  1. Running a jewellery party

I spoke to a regular jewellery school student who ran one jewellery party before christmas and ended up with a large number of orders, including 90 pairs of stud earrings! Either organise it yourself or ask a friend with a lot of connections if they would be willing to host a party. Usually you provide some refreshments and have samples of your work for people to order from. Make sure you get organised and take all the details you need from your customers and be clear about when items can be ready by.

Image from Bling Rocks

  1. Approaching a local paper for a feature

I teach the PR for your jewellery business course and we discuss ways to be featured in the press. One of the first things I suggest is trying local papers and publications as they are always on the lookout for local interest stories. Find out who the editor is and prepare a short description of your business and your development, highlighting that you are local. Contact them directly by email if you can (phone the newspaper office to get the email address if it isn’t listed in the paper) and send through a couple of good quality shots of your work. If they are featuring you they will probably also want a photo of you!

 

What innovative ways have you found to promote your business? Please share what has worked for you by making a comment on this post or via our instagram, twitter or facebook pages.

Anna Campbell is a metal clay artist and tutor at the London Jewellery School and runs her own jewellery business Campbell Hall Designs.

Special Business Week offers

Don’t forget about our special offers on business courses for this week only.

These offers are only available on booking made during Jewellery Business Week 21-27 February 2016 inclusive. Call 020 3176 0546.

Click here for more details of all the business courses included in this offer.

Making the best of your Instagram pictures

Following on from our introductory look at Instagram as a great social media option for jewellery makers we have put together some tips for ensuring your account looks as good as possible.

 

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Having fabulous pictures of your work is important whatever ways you use to share your work and sell your pieces, so it is worth checking out our previous photography posts. But because Instagram is all about the images, picture quality is essential here.

Post the best images you can

Yes, it is possible to take a quick snap on your phone and post it to Instagram. This is great for workshop shots or a post to let people know you are setting up at a fair or market but not so good for shots of finished pieces.

For pictures of your finished work, you want to think in the same way as you would for your website or a flier. Use high resolution, well-lit pictures with neutral backgrounds or on models if that’s your preference. And follow these steps so that you can add them to Instagram on your phone or tablet:

  • Create Instagram copies of these high quality images, cropping them so that they will look good in a post.
  • Save the copies to a folder in a cloud service such as Google Drive, Apple iCloud or Dropbox so you can access them on your phone or tablet
  • Go to the folder on your device and export the picture you want to Instagram where you can post your image and message.

This may seem like a complicated process at first but you will soon get used to it and it will ensure you have as good and eye-catching images as possible.

Filters

instagram filters

When you add a picture to Instagram you are given a wide range of filters to apply to your picture. Each of these changes the look of your image by adding a colour tint, increasing or decreasing the saturation of the colours, etc.

When you start using Instagram, it is important to look at what changes each filter makes to your images and choose what works for your style of work.

It is important to be consistent and use the same filters each time. It may be that you think one filter is good for jewellery pictures and a different one for behind the scenes/making shots – in that case make a note of what these are and always use the behind the scenes filter of those shots and the finished piece one for your products. This will make you feed look smart and establish a visual style that will help people spot your posts.

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Behind the scenes shots

A great way of telling your jewellery story is to post shots of the process of making your jewellery. These could be quick working shots but you could also think of taking some still life type images of sketches, tools and materials arranged in your workspace.

Think about what might interest people but also images that shoe the work and time that goes into a handmade piece.

Inspiration collages

Another story telling technique that appeals to Instagram users is sharing images of what inspire your work.

These could be individual images or you could use a collage making app like PicMonkey to combine a picture of a finished piece with some of the images that inspired you.

Learn from others

And finally, one way to help you work out your Instagram style is to spend time looking at other people’s posts. Think about what type of images catch your eye and which are getting lots of likes. This will help you decide what is important for you to do to attract the followers your need.

Please follow London Jewellery School on the app – then we can follow you and see your work.

Jewellery Business Week: Five ways to streamline your jewellery business

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Running your own jewellery business is rewarding but you often have to be a jack of all trades. Here is some advice from tutor and jewellery business owner Anna Campbell on how to streamline your efforts

1. Schedule your time so you focus on one thing a day

 

This advice comes from business writer Robin Sharma and helped transform the way that I run my business.

Firstly, spend some time planning your week in advance. I tend to do this on a Sunday. Use a diary or calendar to fill in everything you have to do during the week. For example, as a tutor I will sometimes have classes I need to teach so I will add them into my weekly planner.

Then structure your week so you try to focus on one thing per day.

For example, one day for

  • making new stock
  • designing new ranges
  • working on your social media
  • packing and going to the post office (if you guarantee delivery within 5 working days you can go to the post office once a week)
  • paperwork, administration and ordering new stock

If you try to do everything every day your concentration gets scattered and you get less done but if you focus on one main task per day you can achieve so much more. If an idea comes up that would be best done on a different day simply write it down and get back to what you were doing.

2.Daily to do lists

If your to do list is so long and daunting you find it difficult to even look at it then try this.

By all means keep the long master to do list but then break this down into daily tasks. This way you know what you need to accomplish on any given day (because you have planned your time at the start of the week) and you don’t get overwhelmed about where to start. You also get a sense of achievement when you are able to do what you’ve planned for the day that you don’t get with a master to do list as it’s never all done!

I started using bullet journalling (a paper-based method of structuring to do lists and notes) and I’ve found it very helpful.

3. Hire around your weaknesses

If you’re not good at something chances are you are either avoiding it or you take longer to do it than someone else could. Consider hiring someone to do the things you’re not good at or bartering with someone that you know could help you out. Have a look at people per hour, a site where you can post a job and get bids for the work from all over the world.

Also consider the ethos of Tim Ferriss author of ‘The four hour work week’. The premise is that our time is worth a certain amount of money per hour. If you can pay someone less to do certain tasks that need to be done it frees you up to do the work that earns you your best hourly rate. For example, if you do the cleaning in the house could you pay someone else to do that for you? It would free you up for that time to do the work that is more lucrative.

4. Utilise free online services

There are a number of free online services that you could utilise to help save you time, particularly when working on your social media presence.

Try bufferapp, a free service that allows you to schedule messages in advance to go on Twitter, Facebook, Google plus and Linkedin.

If you write a blog, spend a day writing some blog posts and schedule them to publish periodically.

5. Keep paperwork up to date

Whether you’re a sole trader or have a limited company, you will need to ensure you keep your paperwork up to date for your tax return. If you leave it to the last minute there’s a big panic about getting your return in on time and I’m sure you will end up paying more as you will not log everything.

Schedule a day a week to keep on top of your administration. Work out a system that works for you. I bought a lovely small filing cabinet drawer (it’s a gorgeous teal colour). All receipts to be logged go in there. I log everything on Go Simple Tax (I adore this service). It’s so straightforward to use and when you’re ready to submit your tax return the information is automatically put into the correct format and uploaded to the gateway). I put a felt tip dot on all receipts that I have already logged online and file them away in case they’re needed.

What business advice would you give? Please comment below and share your wisdom with us all

Anna Campbell is a tutor at the London Jewellery School and runs her own jewellery business Campbell Hall Designs. She sells online from her website and at the Things British shop in Greenwich, London.

Get 20% all jewellery business classes booked between 22 and 28 February 2015 – offer includes all business day classes and tasters, Business Bootcamp, and the 6-day Jewellery Business Intensive. For details of included classes click here

Call 020 3176 0546 to book – this offer is not available online

October Offer on all London Jewellery School business day courses

Get a bonus for your jewellery business this month.

Book any business day class with London Jewellery School during October 2014* and we’ll send you a Jewellery Business Distance Learning Course pack for free** (RRP £99).

That means double the business learning for your jewellery venture.

Whether you want to boost your business for Christmas, develop a new website or are thinking of launching a jewellery venture in 2015, there is a business class for you.

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The Jewellery Business Distance Learning Course has over an hour of video and a 50-page work book

Plus, the Jewellery Business Distance Learning Course will help you for years to come. The pack includes a 50-page workbook, case studies of successful jewellery business and a DVD featuring over an hour of advice from three expert tutors – Jessica Rose, Hayley Kruger and Anna Campbell – on everything from the legal and tax issues around starting your business to the essentials of marketing and pricing.

Call 020 3176 0546 to book your business day class and claim your distance learning pack.

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London Jewellery School has a range of classes to help you build your business and promote your jewellery

*Courses can taken after October but must be booked by midnight on 31 October 2014.

**Distance learning packs will be posted out to all customers in the UK. Overseas students can collect their packs when they attend their class.

 

How Pinterest can help your jewellery business

There are so many different social media platforms out there it’s hard to keep up. In this post business tutor Anna Campbell explains why you should be using Pinterest.

What is Pinterest?

Pinterest is a free online tool that allows you to collect together images of things that interest you. You can create collections (or boards) of visual images (or pins). These images can be uploaded by you or ‘pinned’ from a website and can include videos.

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Why should I be interested?

Pinterest has a couple of uses for the jewellery artist as a designer but primarily the main benefits are as a seller.

Recently, the site has been getting a lot of press. This is because:

  • it is currently producing the most revenue of any social media platform (people see a product they like on pinterest, click on it to find out more and will buy)
  • the average transaction value of someone finding a product on pinterest and buying it is between $140 and $180 (£83-£107)
  • 80% of pinterest users are women

One of the benefits over other social media is the way that people use it. On Pinterest people will search through categories to look at items e.g. jewellery. People don’t use Facebook or Twitter in that way and it means something you added to Pinterest two months ago can still be found.

How should I use it as a designer?

Pinterest is great for creating visual inspiration boards.

In the past you would have to bookmark a page/image that you were interested in or copy and paste the link into another document. Now you can see all the images together in one collection (board) without having to print them out. This allows you to collect online images together in one space which is fantastic for when you are in need of inspiration.

How should I use it as a business?

For those that haven’t used Pinterest before see how to set up an account and how to use Pinterest

To get the best out of Pinterest for your jewellery business:

  • make sure you write your profile and include a profile photo. Your profile photo should be a piece of jewellery that you have made that represents your style rather than a picture of you. Instructions for setting up your profile and adding a photo on Pinterest can be found here
  • pin your own work from your website or a place that a person can buy your piece e.g. etsy, folksy etc. Don’t upload a photo of your work; a person who likes it won’t be able to find a way to buy it if there’s no link to your online shop
  • include a description of the piece in the description box. This allows people to find your jewellery through the search on pinterest. Make sure you include your keywords (the words someone might use to search for your item) e.g. Silver owl pendant handmade by Light Boat Jewellery
  • include the price in the description box
  • create boards that have themes rather than those about a single product. For example, jewellery inspiration, fabric jewellery etc. Include some of your jewellery alongside other people’s. That way people aren’t turned off by thinking you are just about pushing your products onto them
  • consumers like to see photos of your creative process so pin photos of this if you have some (again from your website or blog)

Warning: Pinterest can be addictive!

Once you start searching through for images time can run away from you. But it is a useful, free tool to use both as a designer and as a jewellery business. Have a go.

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Anna Campbell is an experienced teacher and enjoys different types of jewellery making including beading and metal clay. She runs her own business, Light Boat Jewellery and has made jewellery for celebrities.

Jewellery Business Week: Get to know your customers via social media

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London Jewellery School tutor and jewellery designer Anna Campbell reveals how social media can help you know more about what your customers think and get them to help you make decisions.

As a designer/maker I can feel a little isolated. I’m sure there are times when you feel the same.

Often I am working alone and don’t have people around to use as a sounding board. This can make decision-making feel hard at times. Which colour shall I choose for my new logo? What theme should I choose for my new summer range? Sometimes I feel the weight of those decisions on my shoulders.

But, I want to remind you that there are some people out there who are interested and will give you an opinion if you ask. They are those people who have clicked ‘like’ on Facebook page or who have followed your blog or Twitter, Google+ or Pinterest profiles. Why not ask them for an opinion?

Social networking is not just about you shouting ‘buy my jewellery’.

If that is all you are saying you may be turning some potential customers, stockists and collaborators off.

So, why not try:

Asking a question

For example, if you are trying to write a tagline for your business, give people your shortlist and ask which is their favourite and why.

Sharing photos

Have you got two design variations and you can’t decide which one you prefer? Put a photo of them both up and ask people to tell you which they prefer and why. The answers might surprise you and prompt new ideas.

Asking for advice

Not sure whether to try selling at a particular craft market? Ask your followers and see what they say

Of course you don’t have to take their advice. But you could benefit from the wisdom of the crowd. Or a comment could prompt another new idea or validate a tentative one.

Plus when customers are engaged with you as a business they are loyal – when they want to buy they will look to you first.

So, how could asking your followers help you with something today?

Anna Campbell Smartie Jewellery

Anna’s Smartie bracelet, part of her range of jewellery based on sweets

Anna  runs her own jewellery business and teaches many of our business classes including Business Bootcamp, PR for Your Jewellery Business, Building a Website, Social Media and Getting Your Business Seen on Google – of which are available at a 20% discount if you book during Jewellery Business Week, click here for details.

You can find out more about her and her work at www.acampbell.info

Exciting new jewellery business classes at the London Jewellery School

We are very excited to announce the creation of four new jewellery business classes.

One of the benefits of a truly global online marketplace is that you can sell jewellery to countries you have never been to, and all while you sleep!

However, many other jewellery makers have had the same idea so how do you ensure that you are well represented and promoted online? Following on from our successful PR for your jewellery business taster class our experienced tutor, Anna Campbell, has designed some new classes to help jewellery and craft business owners get online.

Why have you decided to run these new classes?
The PR for your Jewellery business class continues to be a popular and successful taster class. The Jewellery School has grown and our students have grown and many are now looking to sell their jewellery and craft online. The PR class is excellent for those who are already familiar with social networking sites but feedback from our students is that many would like some more practical help with setting up a website, on social networking sites as well as advice on search engine optimisation.

How will the classes be taught?

You will be taught in groups of no more than eight students, as with all our classes. Each student will be provided with a laptop with an internet connection for the duration of the class and your tutor will talk you through the process step by step, giving support and advice on what to say and how to say it and help you feel confident in using your website or social networking sites at home.

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Designing Your Own Website  (10am-5pm)

In this one day intensive class you will set up your own website using the free and simple to use website creation tool weebly.com.

Have a look at your tutor’s website that was created using weebly http://www.acampbell.info/

Techniques covered in this class include:

  • Setting up your own website with your choice of colours and layout
  • Setting up different pages so you can showcase photos of your work, create a ‘contact me’ form, about me section etc
  • Editing and adding to your pages so that you are confident in doing this at home
  • Purchasing a domain name (a website address) and attach it to your website
  • Setting up a sliding gallery of your images
  • Advice on selling online through the website (see below), online marketplace e.g. etsy, folksy etc

This class has been designed for new or existing jewellery business owners who would like to set up a website – whether to showcase their work or to sell from alternative sites e.g. etsy, folksy etc

Please note, if you want to set up a merchandised website you will need to purchase a professional weebly account (this is not covered in the course fee). Advice will be given on this and the costs involved and it is simple to do with weebly via google checkout or a paypal business account.

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Social Media for Your Jewellery Business  (10am-5pm)

To actively promote your jewellery business you need to utilise the free social media that is out there to connect with potential customers. On this course you will set up business accounts and learn how to effectively promote your business on

  • twitter
  • facebook
  • pinterest

You will learn how to brand your business so that you link your social media together and have a coherent look to your business and get advice on how to use these effectively and efficiently so you can get on with making jewellery!

This course is designed for beginners with no knowledge or experience of social media.

Creating Your Own Jewellery Blog  (6.30pm-9.00pm)

Handmade jewellery is more popular than ever but how do you get your story across? Many people looking to buy unique and handmade items want to know the story behind them and the maker. A blog (short for weblog – a type of online diary)  is an excellent way of telling your story and connecting with buyers.

Techniques covered in this class include:

  • Setting up a free blog using google’s blogger.com service
  • Formatting your blog to make it look attractive to readers
  • Learning how to write a blog post, include images etc
  • How to link other social media you may already have to your blog e.g. twitter, facebook, pinterest
  • What to write and how often

Getting your business seen on Google (6.30pm-9.00pm)

Search engine optimisation (SEO) is important as it is the way you ensure your website, blog etc appear higher up the google search.

  • Techniques covered in this class:
  • Learn what people search for
  • How to ensure your website/blog etc can be optimised
  • Understand keywords and how to use them

About the tutor – Anna Campbell

My background is quite unusual but ideal for these classes! I am a qualified teacher and have previously worked in IT for a university teaching the professors how to use online services. I have developed my jewellery business and teaching to a point where I have given up that job in order to concentrate more on my business and jewellery designs. I have successfully used social media and my website to generate sales from all over the world.

Job Opportunity: Projects and Web Co-ordinator, London Jewellery School

The London Jewellery School are looking for a dynamic and creative individual to join their staff team and co-ordinate crucial projects including the Diploma in Creative Jewellery, promotions for classes and managing content for their two websites.

Working Hours: Full Time (Mon-Fri 10-7pm)

Salary: £20,000 p.a. (plus £2000 training budget to spend on LJS courses)

About London Jewellery School:

London Jewellery School is Europe’s largest jewellery training centre, based in central London’s, Hatton Garden. We host 100’s of fun and professional jewellery classes every year open to students of all abilities from complete beginner through to experienced jewellers. The School was set up by Jessica Rose in 2009 and since staring we have trained over 5,000 students. We now have a thriving team of over 25 jewellery tutors, 5 staff members and two fully equipped studios. For more see www.londonjewelleryschool.co.uk

About the Role:

We are looking for someone to join the team and co-ordinate some of the schools key activities including:

–       Diploma in Creative Jewellery www.jewellery-diploma.co.uk

–       Promoting specific classes both on and offline

–       Social media including regular Facebook and Twitter content and engagement with students in our networks

–       Maintaining and updating content and images on our two websites

–       Photography of classes, samples and students work

–       General office and studio support as being part of the team

For a full Job description please visit: http://www.londonjewelleryschool.co.uk/jobs-at-ljs/

How to Apply:

If you have the experience and skill to be an excellent Projects and Web Co-ordinator for the London Jewellery School please send your cover letter and C.V. to Jessica@londonjewelleryschool.co.uk on or before 5pm on Wednesday 13th March

Interviews for shortlisted candidates will be held on Wednesday 27th March

Jewellery Business Week – Anna Campbell shares her web wisdom

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Anna Campbell is an LJS tutor teaching a number of jewellery making classes and PR for your Jewellery Business. She mentors artists and crafters in setting up their website and using social media to promote their businesses for Crafty Websites and runs her own jewellery business, Light Boat Jewellery. She is also one of the tutors appearing in the new videos for our updated LJS Jewellery Business Distance Learning Course.

We asked her to tell us a little about her own business experiences.

What motivated you to start your own jewellery business?

I was a full time teacher and started taking jewellery making classes in my spare time. I found I really enjoyed learning new techniques and combining silver clay with beading, wire wrapping etc. It was a natural step for me to start selling pieces as I had made far too many to wear myself!

What has been your best business decision?

Taking it slowly! I started out with two Etsy shops and I didn’t sell anything from one of them! The other went well and I still have it. Setting up on a site like Etsy (or Folksy or Misi – there are so many options now) is much cheaper than setting up your own website to start with. You pay a few pence to list an item on the site and then a percentage when you sell. This means you don’t have to have huge start up money to test the waters.

You also need a lot less stock on hand – I often make one piece to photograph and put on Etsy but I don’t have multiples. I make sure I always have enough beads to make the pieces I have for sale on Etsy but I tend to make the piece when the order comes in. That way, if the customer has any specific requests e.g. they don’t like a specific colour of bead, I can easily respond and make the piece the way the customer wants.

What has been the biggest surprise/shock about running your own business?

The impact that using social media effectively has on your business. Many people think that they can set up a website or an Etsy shop and they will instantly get sales. Unfortunately that’s not the case, you need to actively promote what you have to offer. But there is good news as there are free social media sites e.g. facebook, twitter etc where you can promote what you’re selling effectively. I have had a lot of success with twitter and know I’ve had sales directly through being on there.

Would you like to share a mistake you’ve made that others could learn from?

If you’re making commissioned pieces make sure you are very clear with your client about exactly what they want. If they’re happy for you to just make them something one-off then fine, but one time I thought I’d understood the brief and got it wrong! I suggest taking a design commission fee and design it first on paper or make a rough piece so that you can send them a picture of it. That way if they decide not to go ahead with it you haven’t wasted time and money because you have been paid for that design.

What one thing would you say to someone starting their own jewellery business?

There’s never been a better time to do it so go for it! We now have a truly global marketplace – I sell more pieces overseas than to the UK – and this means that you have so many more potential buyers. It’s also a cost effective time to set up. You don’t need a shop full of stock or a gallery that will take a large percentage.

The photo in this blog post was taken by photographer Gary Ullah at Crafty Websites who offers jewellery photography as a service.

biz 2Don’t forget there is still time to get the special jewellery week 15% discount on our distance learning jewellery business course which covers all aspects of running a successful jewellery business from legal and tax issues, to budgets, selling and pricing and marketing your products.  The course includes over a hour of videos, a workbook and case studies of successful jewellers, as well as including a year’s membership of LJS which gives you discounts from suppliers and a listing on the LJS Members’ Directory.

To get your discount buy the course before midnight on Sunday 20 January 2013 and enter the code LJSDL13 at the check out. Please note the discount is restricted to one per person.