Tag Archives: riba

Design jewellery inspired by architecture – a partnership with the Royal Institute of British Architects

royal-institute-british-architectsYou’re invited to a unique jewellery workshop inspired by Art-deco surroundings.

We’re very excited to announce that we are partnering with the Royal Institute of British Architects and will be running a beginners wax carved ring workshop in the gorgeous art-deco RIBA building.

What: Wax carved ring inspired by architecture

Where: RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London

When: 3rd November 2018, 11-4pm

Tickets: Click here for more information and to book tickets >

Suitable for complete beginners

 

This taster workshop will be run by an LJS tutor at RIBA’s iconic art-deco building where the incredibly intricate interiors can be used to inspire your ring designs. We just love all the gorgeous details of this fascinating building. Take a look at some of the carving that you’ll get to see

riba-carvingUsing photos and sketches from your tour, you’ll then develop two unique designs that you’ll bring to life in blue jeweller’s wax, pre-cut into ring blanks.

wax-carved-silver-ring-london-jewellery-school

With our expert guidance, you’ll then use hand tools to carve and shape your designs throughout the rest of the day. We’ll take you through the process of sizing, shaping, applying heat and how to add intricate detail and texture to your carvings.

By the end of the workshop you’ll have created two rings in wax, and have learned about the full process of wax carving and casting jewellery. The difficult part will be selecting your favoured design to be cast offsite. With a choice of silver, copper or bronze, your spectacular ring will be fully polished and finished for you or the intended recipient to wear. We’ll post your ring to you within 2 weeks of the workshop.

This event is for students and adults aged 18 and over. It is suitable for complete beginners and we have a maximum of 7 students per class allowing lots of one-on-one attention from our experienced tutor.

All materials will be provided. Online booking in advance is essential. Click here to find out more and to book a place >

Images are courtesy of RIBApix 

World Architecture Day-1st October

Here we look at the many ways that jewellery can be made architectural as a celebration of World Architecture Day. Architects love putting on different creative hats within the design world. The humble chair is often the focus of their attentions, but they are equally inclined (rather than reclined) to turn their hands to the decoration of necks, fingers and ears. Architectural jewellery is a term, it seems, used for what modern architectural forms can bring to design, rather than the incorporating of the columns and domes of classical architecture into collections-which is frankly a shame.

However Vicki Amberly Smith doesn’t shy away from this creating recognisable mini-structures in meticulous detail. From Palladio to Lubetkin’s Penguin Pool in mini metal models, you can sport a whole building on your hand from her ring collection.

Starchitects who have dabbled in the jewellery world include Frank Gehry in collaboration with Tiffany & Co and the late, great Zaha Hadid with Georg Jensen.

As we know, the lure of jewellery making is strong and many a former architect has turned full-time jewellery maker, to the good fortune their customers and inspirational joy for us. Great jewellery is something you want to inhabit. It makes you feel good, just as a well-considered built environment should do. Jewellery should be as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional and improve the quality of your life (not a lot to ask. Is it?). It’s the kind of high-level design work that architects do for their clients, thinking about their needs, lifestyles and use of materials. I think we should feel privileged to be in the company of makers like the following converts Amanda Li Hope, Jeanne Marrell and Yeena Yoon.

Images: Juliet Sheath

 

These pieces by Jeanne Marrell highlight the precise and intricate use of materials in her work.

 

 

Reminiscent of an iconic building that may not have been built yet, Ute Decker makes pieces that are both sculptural and architectural in their flowing forms.

 

The bold, brights of Finest Imaginary are often directly inspired by architecture, making versions of houses that can travel with you – clearly better than just one home.

Usually it’s the buildings that an architect leaves behind that become their legacy. While jewellery can be a reminder of a loved one who has passed away. But in the case of Luis Barragan, artist Jill Magid ensured that the memory of the prominent Mexican architect was immortalised in a diamond ring. A 2 carat diamond ring was created from his ashes as an offering for his archive.

Of course, you may want to put your heart and soul into your jewellery making, but maybe not your mortal remains. So if you are feeling like you could be inspired by architecture, visit us at our new digs for the day at the RIBA. We will be partnering with the RIBA for a Wax Carving Class in magnificent Art Deco surroundings on Saturday 3rd November.

Jewellery inspiration – the Shape of things

Recent visits to the Bauhaus Archive in Berlin and the Mies Van der Rohe and James Stirling exhibition ‘Circling the Square’ at the RIBA in London have inspired Lil to consider the design power of basic geometric shapes.

Shapes can be fascinating and inspiring and their simple, dynamic qualities can be enough to inspire a lifetime of jewellery making. A triangle is nature’s strongest shape and is often utilised in construction and engineering. The artist Giotto was considered a genius for his perfect drawing of a freehand circle, so it’s potentially worth practising in your spare time to fast track your Mensa application. Squares have much to recommend them too; they are regular, reliable, foldable and mathematically very handy.

Kandinsky, who began teaching at the Bauhaus experimental art school in 1922, believed in a system where certain shapes attributed themselves to particular colours. He felt that yellow belonged as a triangle, squares should be red and circles blue. He also had some interesting feelings about green. Sadly he felt this colour was self-satisfied, like a fat cow, but with hidden strength. I love green, but also cows, so maybe he was onto something.

The current exhibition at the Royal Institute of British Architects, documents the debates of one site in the City of London.  Here we can see two architects, designing years apart and in different styles, result in one building after decades of controversy. Architectural drawings and meticulously conserved and reconstructed models illustrate the project’s processes with accompanying videos and paraphernalia to contextualise the building that never was and the one that might never have been. Both schemes have a lot to recommend them in terms of ‘shapespiration’ (inspiration from shapes, hoping this will catch on), from Mies’s famous quote ‘Less is more’ to the handling of Stirling’s building that now stands at No.1 Poultry, with its interplay of shape and colour. If Stirling’s sketches don’t leave you inspired and the beautiful 1930’s building of the RIBA headquarters doesn’t hit the spot, hopefully some of my favourite shapely jewellery finds below will.

Thinking just about within the box with this circle band trapped in a cube ring by Etsuko Sonobe.

 Kioko Hashimoto allows this circular cabochon to brazenly defy its true (Kandinsky designated) colour.

 

Rhona McCallum shows us how to circle with squares with this angular silver marvel.

Not so square-jeweller Amy Glenn utilises these two handy shapes in her edgy ring designs.

If you are looking for a great way to fast track shaping your ideas into a wearable beauties like these check out our Diploma Courses in Creative Jewellery Making.

Boxing clever or circling the drain? Let us know how your projects are going in the comments below. Are you inspired by geometric shapes? How do they relate to your designs?

Lil Adams is the London Jewellery School Sundays Studio Manager. Lil studied Fine Art in Leeds and lived in Melbourne before travelling about and settling in London. She now works at the British Architectural Library and enjoys making jewellery with found and natural objects and is shamelessly addicted to casting.