Tag Archives: jewellers

Who needs beads? The (w)hole of civilisation

It is National Beading Week so we have been taking a look at how beads have been used in contemporary jewellery designs

A bead can be anything threadable. The first pieces of jewellery were beads made from shells, while the trading of beads was one of the first forms of currency leading to the development of language. Oh yeah and they are pretty too.

It’s worth keeping your beady eye on the graduates spilling out of this year’s degree shows. They are fresh and dynamic and completely varied. Some of the bright young things of Central Saint Martins have favoured using beads this year and are creating some great examples of the potential for striking results that can be achieved. Rosanna Batt uses delicate threads of shimmering beads to trace the outlines of the body to create garments that challenge traditional ideas of function in clothing and jewellery as decoration.

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Rosanna Batt

Bead counting toys have been a traditional sight in the doctor or dentist waiting room aiding the development of fine motor skills in children. Also used as the inspiration for Dani Lane’s Abacus Maximus rings, a delight for any kidult stuck in a dull meeting.

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Dani Lane

Teri Howes takes simple bead threading to another level with her knitted and crochet fine jewellery pieces.

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Terri Howes

The tiny beads on Just Rocks and Coral’s yellow waterfall necklace work as a team to make for a bold statement and a cool cascade of colour for the summer.

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Just rocks and coral

Words can’t explain the staggering potential of the humble concept of these items of adornment, but it may be thanks to them that we can use language to attempt it.

Take a look at this video by our founder/director Jessica Rose explaining a simple and effective way of making a quartz crystal bead necklace that can be used for any type of bead.

Inspired? Take a look at our beading classes run at our London studios and our free online course with Jewellery School Online

 

 

 

Five alternatives to selling at a craft fair

Selling at a craft market or fair is just one way to sell to the public. Think laterally; what other opportunities might there be in your local area?  Here are some ideas about alternative places you could sell your work!

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  1. Gallery or jeweller

The most traditional route is to approach relevant galleries or jewellers. Research your options carefully by visiting the shop on more than one occasion to see how busy it gets. Also look at the types of jewellery they currently sell and their price range. You want to ensure your pieces will fit in with the products they already stock but still stand out.

 

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  1. Rent a shelf

Check out local options to rent a shelf in a cafe, hair salon etc. If they don’t have the option available why not make an appointment to speak to the manager about trying it out?

One shop that works on a rent a shelf basis is Things British who sell items (not just jewellery) designed and made in the UK. The company currently has three shops – in St Pancras station, London, Greenwich market, London and Chatham, Kent. You pay a weekly shelf rental charge and anything you sell is yours (minus any card transaction fees). You don’t need to be based in London to sell at Things British, you can send items in by post.

 

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  1. Pop up shops

A pop up shop is an empty shop that is used as a short term sales space. You can do this alone or share with other designers. Search for these in your area or check out We are Pop Up or Appear here which lists opportunities to rent and share.

 

  1. Hotels

Hotels have a lobby area where a display cabinet of jewellery for sale could be successful as they have a steady stream of different customers through their doors. Find out who the decision maker at the hotel is (by asking at reception) and make an appointment to see them.

 

  1. Museums

Many of the larger museums have a competitive application process for selling your work but a first step could be to consider smaller, local museums especially if you have a range that would fit in with an exhibition they have. They are often receptive to work from local artists and makers.

 

Have a think about where in your local area to approach and start doing some research. What other ideas can you share with us? Let us know in the comments below

Look out for a coming blog post ‘Step by step guide to successfully selling your jewellery range to a retailer’

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Author: Anna Campbell

LJG Guest Blogger - Anna Campbell of Campbell Hall Designs