Tag Archives: gemstone course

Introducing our new Gemmology tutor – Deborah Mazza

Do you wish you had more knowledge about gemstones? To feel more confident when talking to customers or when choosing stones to buy? We have just created a new one-day Gemstones Masterclass and want to introduce our new expert tutor Deborah Mazza.

deborah-mazza-tutor-london-jewellery-schoolTell us a little bit about yourself and what you do

I was born in Sicily, I am bilingual as my mother is English and my father Italian. I moved to Germany in 1984 and trained as a gemmologist with the Deutsche Gemmologische Gesellschaft and the Gemmological Association of Great Britain. I taught gemmology to English classes in the German Gemmological Association, and besides buying and selling gems, I also worked as a jewellery valuer. I then attained a bachelor in Business in 2006. When I moved back to the UK I carried on jewellery valuations with my own company. I hold the Certificate of Appraisal Theory with the National Association of Jewellers and also teach with Gem-A (the Gemmological Association of Great Britain)

What’s been your general career path?

All through my career, I have worked with gems and jewellery, it has been my life passion and it still fascinates me. I worked in the gems and jewellery trade in Idar-Oberstein, Germany, the gemstone centre in Europe; there they buy and sell gemstones to the whole world, it is still the leading gem lapidary and carving centre.

I have also finally started making jewellery, which I was unable to do before due to family commitments.

gemstone-masterclass-london-jewellery-schoolWhat are your goals for the future?

My children have grown up and moved out, allowing me to collaborate in writing Vladyslav Yavorsky’s latest book, Terra Connoisseur – Gemstones, and organising trips to meet Idar-Oberstein’s craftspeople.

I have just finished my bachelor in Art History at Goldsmiths University. In autumn 2018 I am starting my masters, as I think we need a theory of jewellery and gemstones similar to the theory of art.

What is your favourite gemstone why?

I have no favourite gemstone, which sounds strange, because I just love them all for their wide colour variations and effects, this is the main reason why I wear lots of jewellery, now also made by myself.

Find out more about Deborah’s work on her website http://www.laetherstone.com/

You can join Deborah for our new Gemstone masterclass. Learn about gemstone identification, cleaning and handling, colour, hardness, durability and much more. If you enrol for a weekday class you will also visit A E Ward gemstone suppliers in Hatton Garden 

To find out more about the course and to enrol click here

 

Birthstone for July-Ruby-Not just for Tuesdays or trips with Toto

July folk are said to be fun-loving, cheerful and independent. Ruby is their stone and it’s said to bring good fortune to those that wear it (though whether those in possession of a ruby need more good fortune is debatable) for, much like their clear relative the diamond, rubies can be incredibly valuable. Often used in simply set rings, their intense colour means they don’t need a lot of fuss. But it is this eye-catching colour that can also be used to add accents, such as gleaming eyes in an elaborate diamond encrusted snake or leopard piece. The purest colour of ruby is known as pigeon’s blood, a fact which gives rise to the idea of working on a red-eyed pigeon collection.

ruby_triptych_1tessametcalfe

Jeweller Tessa Metcalfe uses her trademark cast pigeon foot to set these deep red beauties.

Ruby is also the symbolic stone of 40 years of marriage, making a gift of ruby jewellery on this occasion meaningful and poignant. But if it’s your birthstone you may want to indulge in your own love affair celebrating its other meanings of health and wisdom. Like Dorothy, who took her ruby slippers off the feet of the squashed wicked witch, you don’t need to wait forty years to get involved. Go on an adventure with a Lion, Scarecrow, Tinman and the all important pup Toto. Alternatively find some inspiration from these jewellers, who are clearly besotted with rubies and not thinking about trotting them down any yellow brick roads anytime soon.

Crushed_6-kelvin birkCrushed and combined precious stones that bring a new dimension to these unique pieces by Kelvin Birk, making them more wearable in their informal ‘spacefragmentness’ than a typical setting.

Clawrings_4, kelvin birk

Grasping claws, gilded boxes and indents in irregular bands are a few of this imaginative jeweller’s repertoire for showing off precious stones.

 

fraserhamiltonThis little ruby is benefiting from the hands-on approach to stone setting of Fraser Hamilton.

Why not get to grips with stone setting or find out more about gemstones in one of our courses.

Lil Adams is the London Jewellery School Sundays Studio Manager. Lil studied Fine Art in Leeds and lived in Melbourne before travelling about and settling in London. She now works at the British Architectural Library and enjoys making jewellery with found and natural objects and is shamelessly addicted to casting.